Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Why MUN Matters: We Are a Global Family

By Ahmad Bromund
Finalist for the 2018 Student Secretary-General of the Spring Model UN Conference
9th Grader from Muslim Community School/Alim Academy in Maryland

“More than ever before in human history, we share a common destiny. We can master it only if we face it together. And that, my friends, is why we have the United Nations.” Former Secretary-General Kofi Annan made this statement to the United Nations in his millennium message nearly two decades ago, and it still rings true today. In a world where people are judged and divided by religion, culture, race, and socioeconomic status, partaking in Model United Nations (MUN) has taught me the importance of working together as one society for the greater good of mankind.

MUN is an excellent program in which students have the opportunity to explore ideas and solutions for today’s most pressing issues, as well as develop exceptional speaking, debating, and researching skills. MUN also teaches principles of diplomacy, leadership, and critical thinking. In the three MUN conferences I have attended, I have learned that in order to be a strong speaker and debater, I must first be a strong listener. The only way a group of problem-solvers and critical thinkers can be productive is to listen to others’ ideas and have an open mind. Going into a setting such as MUN with this mindset of listening, opposed to just hearing, opens the door to greater possibilities.

In the three years I have been involved with MUN, my understanding of global thinking and sense of community has expanded exponentially. Throughout my MUN journey, I have been particularly inspired by a quote from former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon: “As the young leaders of tomorrow, you have the passion and energy and commitment to make a difference.

What I’d like to really urge you do is to have a global vision. Go beyond your country; go beyond your national boundaries. We are very fortunate to live in a country such as the United States. In this country, we have extreme comforts and privileges, which can cause our working minds to become constricted. Participating in MUN has expanded my mind and vision from a personal scale to a global scale. It’s not all about me and those in my sphere anymore; I must think about my fellow brothers and sisters who are suffering around the world, for we are a global family.

For example, I had never heard of the crisis in the Sahel and Chad Basin until MUN this year, and now I have the chance to study and analyze the causes and solutions for this crisis. I love how MUN brings the world closer together, showing me that I, along with my peers can have a positive impact on this world, because everyone deserves basic human rights.

The MUN body represents striving for our peace and unification. At the conferences, dividing lines become a blur. Differences are put aside and minds start to work together in harmony, to solve a problem, that none of us can solve alone. We work with fellow diplomats of different races, religions, and backgrounds, and we respect them for who they are and what they believe. We learn to put our differences aside and focus on solidarity, so we can all work and strive for peace together. We become many minds put together, working with one another as one powerful force. Then hand in hand, as one entity with one goal, we will all work to bring issues to rest, one by one.

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